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You’ve landed a job offer. Congratulations! Now, you have to decide if you’ll accept it. Occasionally, an offer is so good that the choice is obvious, but most of the time, that’s just not the case. Every position has its benefits and drawbacks, and no two companies are exactly alike, but there are some common questions you should ask yourself and factors you should contemplate before saying yes or no to an offer. Here are six key things to consider.

Step 1: Do a gut check.

Before you think about negotiating or even get into the details, take a moment to consider your initial reaction to the offer and the job itself. While data is important, you also want to trust your gut.    During your interviews, were you hopeful things would work out? Or, would you have been relieved if they chose someone else? Don’t dismiss concerns, even if they were just fleeting thoughts.  Your instinct and intuition about whether or not a job is a good fit are usually right.

Ask yourself how you felt when you first got the offer. Was it excited? Disappointed? Something else? Your answer can be incredibly revealing about whether this is the right opportunity for you or not.

Step 2: Ask yourself the big questions.

Before diving into the numbers and other specifics in the offer, you should ask yourself the following important questions: Are the tasks and responsibilities of the job something you want to do full time? Did the team and environment you will be working in seem pleasant and safe? What are the sacrifices you’re making by taking this particular job, and are any of those sacrifices things you don’t want to give up?

Basically, you want to be sure that you’re going to be happy with your day-to-day life in this new role before getting any further along in the process. If you feel good about your answers, then move along; if not, ask for another meeting to get some questions answered OR communicate it is not the right position and you’ll pass. The key is not to accept or negotiate an offer if you are not willing to work there.”

Step 3: Decide if taking this position will help you advance your career goals.

If you’re job hunting, you’ve probably taken the time to think about what your career goals are and created a list of what you are looking for even before you began searching for a job.  If you’ve done that, go back to the list you created and evaluate the offer against the factors you initially listed. How does this current job offer measure up in terms of opportunity to accomplish these goals?

It’s also important to look beyond financial objectives – money is important, but for long-term job happiness, it shouldn’t be the only thing you consider. The list of questions to contemplate should include: “Are there enough other areas within the organization that you can have room for advancement, even if your immediate supervisor is there for eternity? Does the company support and encourage employees to continue to learn and grow? Will you be able to get home in time for the non-work things that are important to you? Will you be able to cope with the stress level in this new role?  If you feel good about the answers to these questions, move on to the next step.

Step 4: Carefully evaluate the salary and benefits package.

Obviously, compensation matters. It’s important that your needs are met by your job. When evaluating an offer, you need to look at the entire offer, not just the salary.

Often, the base salary alone does not provide the whole compensation picture. It may be that the salary is €5,000 lower than you had hoped for, but the full package being offered counter-balances it. What does the total package contribute to your personal and financial needs? Sometimes, a job that at first glance looks like it’s paying less can actually provide more financial security than a job with a higher salary.  Take into account benefits like Pension; Bonus; Share options; Health care  etc.

Step 5: Understand who you’ll be working with on a day-to-day basis.

This is easier said than done, but it’s important, because you’ll be spending a lot of time with your new team. While it’s tricky to execute, if you can find out more about your future team, you’ll be able to make a more informed decision. It’s important to ask yourself whether you will be working with the kind of people who will engage, excite, and challenge you—without driving you crazy.

Whether and how you can get to know people in advance varies depending on whether you are in the same city as the employer, what your role will be, and how big the group is. But do what you can to get a sense of your future team, because they will have a huge impact on both your job satisfaction and your success.

Step 6: Decide whether the company is really somewhere you want to work.

If you’ve made it this far, the main thing left to determine is how well the company fits into your life, not just in terms of location and size, but also in terms of company culture.  Ask everyone you can about THE company culture; not just their brand, but what it’s really like to work there day to day. No one is going to say ‘Our culture is toxic,’ but you can figure it out through a combination of questions and observations.”

Ask about what you’d look for in a healthy work environment. That might be access to training, how often people get promoted from within, flexibility, recognition, or teams that celebrate together. If too many of these are missing, it may be a red flag.

Another thing to consider is why the job is open in the first place. You should be cautious when a position is open because someone left the company.   If HR tells you the company is growing, that’s great! If the former person whose job you’re replacing moved up in the organization, that’s also a positive sign. But if you see job openings at this company all the time, it may be a sign that it’s not a great place to work.  In other words, staff turnover/attrition can be an important clue as to what it’s really like to work somewhere—one you shouldn’t ignore.

Author: Julie Malacoff

 



  • As a Global IT director with General Motors, it’s critical that I source high calibre technical candidates every time. ERS bring such a level of confidence and integrity to the pipeline of candidates that distinguishes them from everyone else in the market. ERS is about relationship building, getting to know our company, our management team and our requirements. They assist tailoring job specifications to ensure the widest range of candidates are attracted to the job profiles. ERS hands on screening of candidates means that we have an excellent ratio of interviews to job offers and subsequently, shorter ramp-up cycles, improved business value, increased efficiency and low attrition. Candidates are not just screened based on their CVs, ERS invests a lot of time to get to know the candidates and this profiling gets best results, both for my teams and for the prospective candidates. Our local team has hired successfully through ERS from multiple countries which means our teams are also very diverse in their skills, experiences and cultures. The technical roles filled range from Senior managers, Architects, Java developers, Mainframe, Middleware, SAP, High-performance computing, Mobile Development, Infrastructure, scrum masters and a wide range of global operational roles. Global IT Director General Motors

  • ERS, part of the Casseo Group were engaged on a critical programme aimed at further enhancing Dell’s renowned Supply Chain model for outbound logistics in EMEA (Europe, Middle East & Africa). The ERS team immediately “hit the ground running” and added immense value in augmenting the internal Dell IT team seeking to expedite this critical project.  They brought a strategic and realistic view of the possibilities for the project, as well as a professional focus on delivery of a quality product to agreed timescales.  They managed a wide range of internal relationships, as well as cementing the external commitments needed from Dell’s partners to make the project a reality.  Throughout the project life cycle, they always brought a practical perspective to the table when wrestling with a complex project, and executed creative and innovative solutions to ensure success. A very worthwhile partnership which I would eagerly recommend to those in search of external expertise and commitment in meeting their project commitments. Dell

  • GE Financial Insurance (now Genworth Financial) engaged ERS as part of the Casseo group, to assist in the delivery of a complex cross-functional project. The project entailed managing the IT Infrastructure and providing IT Support to assists a dedicated debtor recovery team that was set up specifically for the project. Based in Birmingham, ERS leveraged excellent project management and technical skills to quickly win the confidence of the local team. Over a period of time, ERS as part of the Casseo group worked hand-in-hand with this team to deliver an outstanding result where significant more debts were recovered than had been thought possible.  I have no hesitation in recommending ERS and the Casseo Group. Programme Manager, Genworth Financial

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